Canon PowerShot S100 Review

September 17th, 2011 189 Comments   Posted in Digital Compact Cameras

Like the S95, the S100 can be slipped into a shirt or trouser pocket, whereas the larger G12 is more of a coat-pocket-sized model. Naturally this makes the S100 more attractive as a ‘take anywhere’ camera for keen enthusiasts.
Although the S100 doesn’t look dramatically different from the S95, we are told that Canon went back to the drawing board to design the new camera – we’ve even seen a few design sketches to prove it.
Canon’s new PowerShot S100 looks a very worthy successor to the popular S95. The manufacturer has used technology from across its whole imaging business (video, SLR, lens and compact camera) to produce what appears to be an exciting pocket-sized camera.

Like the S95, the S100 can be slipped into a shirt or trouser pocket, whereas the larger G12 is more of a coat-pocket-sized model. Naturally this makes the S100 more attractive as a ‘take anywhere’ camera for keen enthusiasts.
Although the S100 doesn’t look dramatically different from the S95, we are told that Canon went back to the drawing board to design the new camera – we’ve even seen a few design sketches to prove it.
Canon’s new PowerShot S100 looks a very worthy successor to the popular S95. The manufacturer has used technology from across its whole imaging business (video, SLR, lens and compact camera) to produce what appears to be an exciting pocket-sized camera.

Canon Powershot D10 Review

June 20th, 2009 197 Comments   Posted in Digital Compact Cameras

The Canon PowerShot D10 represents Canon’s first foray into the all-action world of adventure cameras. The Canon D10 is waterproof up to 10 meters / 33-feet deep, freeze proof from -10°C / 14 degrees Fahrenheit, shockproof up to 1.22 meters / 4 feet, and is fully protected from dust. More regular features include a 12 megapixel sensor, 3x zoom lens with Optical Image Stabilization, 2.5 inch LCD screen, and new Smart AUTO, Blink Detection and FaceSelf-Timer modes.

Ease of Use

The Canon PowerShot D10 is certainly very distinctive, with toy-camera-like looks that you’ll either love or hate. Our review model had a turquoise blue and silver colour scheme, which can be customised by purchasing an optional coloured Front Cover Set. This is a well-made digital camera with a sturdy metal body and excellent overall finish. It’s just about small enough to fit into the palm of your hand, featuring a 3x optical zoom lens that’s equivalent to a focal length of 35-135mm. The maximum aperture is a fast f/2.8 at the wide end and a respectable f/4.9 at the other extreme of the zoom range. The PowerShot D10 is quite bulky, measuring 4.9cms thick when turned off, making it more suited to a small camera bag than a trouser pocket, but it only weighs 190g without the battery or memory card fitted.

As with most Canon cameras that we’ve reviewed before, the PowerShot D10 is one of the better models around in terms of build quality. Even the tripod mount is metal instead of plastic and positioned centrally in-line with the lens. The only minor criticism is the lack of any handgrip on the front, with just a smooth, flat finish embossed with the Canon logo, making it more difficult to hold than it really should be. Also, changing cards or batteries is not possible while the camera is mounted on a tripod, because the compartment door hinge is too close to the tripod socket.

The Canon PowerShot D10 has relatively few external controls, 14 in total, which reflects the fact that this is quite a simple camera in functionality terms, with only limited photographic control on offer. All the controls are clearly labeled using industry-standard symbols and terminology. As this camera will spend quite a lot of its life underwater, it thankfully has large On/Off and Shutter buttons, and the optical zoom is operated by buttons on the rear, rather than a more fiddly push/pull lever. We would have liked the zoom buttons to have been a little bigger though for quicker access in more unfamiliar shooting environments.

Located on top of the PowerShot D10 are the Print Transfer, Camera/Movie and Play buttons, plus the On/Off and Shutter buttons, and on the bottom are the metal tripod mount and sealed battery compartment, which also houses the SD memory card slot. On the rear of the PowerShot D10 is the 2.5 inch LCD screen, with all the rear controls located to the right. You can directly access the various focus and flash options by clicking left and right on the navigation pad, whilst up and down are respectively used to set the exposure compensation and timer options. There is sadly no dedicated button for ISO speed, which is a commonly used feature, although you can work around this by optionally setting the Print Transfer button to one of 7 available options (which include ISO speed).

Virtually all of Canon’s compact digicams offer a few little known but advanced functions, and the PowerShot D10 is no exception. These well-kept secrets, which you usually only learn about if you read the user guide attentively, include auto-focus lock (AFL), autoexposure lock (AEL) and flash exposure lock (FEL).  To lock the focus on a subject for a series of consecutive shots, press the Left button on the four-way pad once while holding the shutter release depressed halfway. To lock the ambient exposure, do the same with the Up button. Flash exposure lock is achieved the same way when the flash is set to Forced On. AEL is available in Program, Quick Shot and Movie modes (you needn’t hold down the shutter release for AEL when you are in Movie mode though).

Buy the Canon Powershot D10 Online