Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 Review

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 Compact Digital Camera

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 Compact Digital Camera 20.2 Mega Pixel RX Series 8.3x Optical Zoom Cyber-shot

To numerous photographers — novices and experts alike — digital SLRs signify quality. The fact that you can detach the lens and exchange it for an alternative is irrelevant to those who will never purchase a second optic, and it’s that particular section of the marketplace that Sony’s concentrating on with its Cyber-shot RX10. Everything about the Cyber-shot RX10 is DSLR-like — its form factor, integrated EVF, focusing performance and picture quality are all on par with numerous higher end SLRs — but its awesome 24-200mm lens is permanently affixed. By opting with this relatively rigid design, Sony’s able to produce a constant f/2.8 aperture and extremely high-quality optics in a comfortable package, at a price tag considerably under what a comparable detachable lens would command, were it to really exist to start with. The end result, quite simply, is incredible, however as the price is at the upper end of even deep-pocketed consumers’ budgets, you will want to catch our complete review prior to making any purchase.

Visually, the Cyber-shot RX10 is much like a digital SLR in virtually every way. You will find a noticable grip, a top-mounted monochrome LCD, a pop-up flash, a hot shoe (in this instance, Sony’s Multi Interface Shoe), dedicated mode and exposure-compensation dials, an XGA OLED viewfinder, a 3-inch 1.23M-dot Liquid Crystal Display that tilts upwards 84 degrees and downward 43 degrees and a reasonably large SLR-like lens up front. From the inside, however, the Cyber-shot RX10 is very similar to its compact counterparts, the RX1 and RX100 Mark II. As a matter of fact, the 10 features exactly the same 20.2-megapixel 1-inch BSI CMOS sensor as that latter model, which, although nonetheless quite large, is smaller than the APS-C and 35mm sensors in traditional DSLRs. What’s more, it contains Sony’s potent new BIONZ X processor, which is also located in the Alpha 7 and 7R, along side Sony’s freshly launched A5000.

But back again to that lens. The 24-200mm Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T* optic is unquestionably the celebrity of the show, thanks in no small part to its constant f/2.8 aperture. What makes that significant, you may well ask? The majority of zoom lenses, particularly those permanently connected to a camera, incorporate variable aperture lenses. Although some may perhaps allow you to capture at f/2.8 from the widest focal length (24mm in this instance), you simply will not discover many point-and-shoots boasting of that equivalent aperture at the tele end at the same time. Commonly, a lower-end lens allows apertures no greater than f/5.6 or even f/6.3 at 200mm, and having f/2.8 available instead, you can actually take significantly crisper photos in lower light, or images with velvety bokeh (shallow depth of field) during the daytime. You have still got f/5.6 (right up to f/16) for your use, needless to say, immediately available utilizing the dedicated ring dial round the base of the lens, in case you are after different imaging effects, alternatively.

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 Top View

You can still find a great deal more hardware components to discover, too. Sony’s placed loads of emphasis on connectivity with the Cyber-shot RX10. On the sound front, you can find headphone and microphone jacks, stereo microphones up top as well as being compatible with Sony’s advanced audio accessories utilizing the accessory port which is also a hot shoe — for mounting wireless receivers as well as shotgun mics. You will find an HDMI interface with clean, uncompressed output, a micro-USB interface for data transfers and charging the camera’s 1,080mAh battery (exactly the same unit included in NEX cameras as well as select current Alphas), a dual Memory Stick/SDXC flash card slot and a tripod socket at the base. The camera is rather comfortable to hold on to, and even though it is weightier than you would anticipate, it will not weigh you down whilst it dangles from the neck strap.

Sony hasn’t modified its UI a great deal since the NEX series’ creation in 2010, but just like the other RX products as well as current Alphas, the Cyber-shot RX10 incorporates a tab-based user interface that many of us significantly prefer. Settings are really simple to find along with every thing displayed in a linear format, it’s simple to hop from category to category to generate each of the modifications you require without first going back to your home screen. Capturing choices like file size, ISO and SteadyShot are displayed in the first tab; customizable key modifications and display alternatives are within the next tab, accompanied by wireless-connectivity features, then playback; and then finally general settings like sound levels and display monitor brightness can be found in the 5th tab.

Additionally, there are a great deal of dedicated controls around the camera, and so you will not absolutely need to spend much time in the main menu whatsoever. A function button off to the right of the LCD launches a quick-adjust setting, with direct access to drive mode, flash options, ISO, white balance, metering, et cetera. A display button cycles through a variety of display modes, such as a full-screen real time feed, an advanced settings panel with histogram and physical alignment indicators and an image preview screen with a thorough settings readout placed at the border. Also there is a specific video capture button, an alternative settings dial and a control ring on the back. Up top, you will find there’s backlight switch for lighting the grayscale LCD, a flash release button, a user-configurable button, an exposure-compensation dial and a zoom toggle switch around the shutter release. Additionally there is a focus-mode selector switch along the front side of the camera, right below the lens.

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 Back

Incorporating WiFi, it’s also possible to control the camera utilizing a smartphone or even tablet running Sony’s PlayMemories Mobile app. After establishing a connection to the camera’s wi-fi hotspot, you’re able to only shoot in auto mode with the app — as soon as you connect, auto will override all of the existing camera settings. Photos are sent to the connected device right after capture. Although this is an excellent solution for group self-portraits as well as other tripod photos, as a result of the diminished control options, we would advocate capturing directly on the camera and then transferring pictures to the app from either the camera’s playback mode or perhaps the live gallery viewer within the application. Wi-fi connectivity helps make sharing pictures on the internet a piece of cake, nevertheless — your Instagram account will certainly benefit enormously from the Cyber-shot RX10‘s huge sensor and mighty lens.

At release, Sony’s RX100 arrived with an ambitious price tag, which was a significant sum for a point-&-shoot, especially one which did not appear a great deal different from a model one half its price to the inexperienced eye. Then again extraordinary performance — for any digital camera, actually; not only a pocket-size compact — established this the essential everyday camera of 2012. You can actually make the identical argument here. The Cyber-shot RX10 delivers that level of performance to a considerably larger, although a lot more versatile form factor. Shutter lag is just about nonexistent and also camera’s speed overall is practically flawless. Even wi-fi transfers are far more seamless than we have experienced with a lot of other digital cameras, including previous models from Sony.

The camera can power on and capture its first shot in just over 1.5 seconds. When shifting the frame between a subject 2 meters in the distance and another centimeters from the lens, the Cyber-shot RX10 managed to expose and refocus in approximately 0.25 second. Meanwhile, in the speed-priority continuous setting, we managed to capture 20 successive JPEGs at 9 fps, as opposed to the “approximately ten frames per second” which Sony estimates within the standards. When it comes to transporting pictures wirelessly, it took us 17 seconds from choosing a picture on the camera to receiving a 2-megapixel image on this smart phone, which includes the amount of time needed for this smart phone to connect with the Cyber-shot RX10‘s Wi-fi. Transfers ended up being a great deal faster when choosing pictures on this smart phone instead, because the couple were already paired. A 2-megapixel picture took roughly one second to transfer, whilst a full-resolution photo took only five seconds.

Battery life, as you would probably expect from a camera this large, is superb. The Cyber-shot RX10 utilizes the identical battery as each and every previous NEX digital camera along with the latest Alpha mirrorless cams, and that means you may perhaps already have spare NP-FW50 1,080mAh packs laying about. If you are planning to be away from an electric socket for several days, it would not hurt to take a spare. Nonetheless, we succeeded in making it through every complete day’s shooting with a great deal of juice to spare. We devoted 2 days photographing without recharging the battery pack. The capacity meter reflected a 31 % charge remaining following taking over 700 pictures as well as 5 mins of 720p video, together with a number of Wi-fi transfers as well as some on-camera picture reviews.

As if you didn’t already have enough to anticipate having with the Cyber-shot RX10… Picture quality, no real shock, is incredible. Truly, with this selling price, we would not put up with anything less. No matter whether you want to shoot in bright sunlight or a evening street scene illuminated by a solitary dim light, photos are crisp and free from noise, even at ISO 6400. Video looks phenomenal likewise, even if caught at night.

The Cyber-shot RX10‘s quick power-on and focus times make it quite easy to acquire the photo. In an exposure which includes a fast paced subject, and following a rapid adjustment on the setting dial, pictures can be clicked straight away. The exposure and color balance are precise, plus details are really sharp, regardless of whether the subject is going along very fast.

The tilt-up screen and 24-200mm lens present you with a massive amount of versatility. For street photographers, this really is a necessity.

The Cyber-shot RX10‘s aperture ring, mounted around the lens, allows you to access specific f-stops directly.

The Cyber-shot RX10 is a master of focus and exposure when you take close-up photos. Elements across the foreground are exceedingly razor-sharp, even with comparatively high ISO, while the background is properly blurred, as you would anticipate by having an f/2.8 aperture.

Video quality is every bit as remarkable. The Cyber-shot RX10 has the ability to record at resolutions as high as 1080/60p with AVCHD encoding. Exposures were spot-on universally, and also videos recorded at high sensitivities (ISO 12,800) appeared much better than predicted.

As it is with Sony’s QX10 and QX100 lens cameras, the full-frame Alpha 7 and 7R and even the RX100 Mark II and RX1, the Cyber-shot RX10 lacks competition from other brands, especially if you are looking for virtually identical specifications and performance. Which is not to state you do not possess other choices, nevertheless, if an integrated, fixed-aperture, telephoto zoom lens combined with a 1-inch sensor are the thing that you’re after, there exists ultimately not anywhere else to look. You’re able to, obviously, go for a conventional digital SLR, and of course, if you already possess an assortment of lenses (or you are intending to develop one), an interchangeable-lens camera is definitely your best option.

Canon’s 70D along with the D5300 from Nikon each offer serious still picture and video chops, and they also incorporate built in Wi-fi, as well. You will need to bring your own lens into the mix, including the body-only for the Canon along with the Nikon, in addition to the price of lenses, you are going to considerably surpass the Cyber-shot RX10‘s selling price once you have included the required optics. When it comes to superzooms, Panasonic’s Lumix FZ200 also contains a lens with a constant f/2.8 aperture, which includes a massive 25-600mm focal length, even so the 1/2.3-inch 12.1-megapixel sensor is considerably less proficient compared to what you will get using the Sony. The FZ200 is equipped with affordability on its side, though.

Ultimately, we really love the Sony Cyber-shot RX10. In reality, we battled to fill the negatives segment with anything apart from a high price tag. However your money goes an incredibly long way here, and if you need to record razor-sharp pictures and full-HD movies in just about any lighting condition, with a substantial focal range, you will be challenged to identify a more suitable shooter. This is actually the very best fixed-lens digital camera we have ever used, and we would not be astounded if the RX10 Mark II, when ever it shows up, would be the sole equivalent model worthwhile considering.

Pros

Wonderful Constant f/2.8-aperture 24-200mm lens

Phenomenal image and video quality in all lighting conditions

Excellent performance and battery life

Dedicated exposure-compensation dial

WiFi with NFC

Cons

Expensive

Conclusion

Sony’s Cyber-shot RX10 may perhaps be expensive, but this camera’s a must-buy if you’ve got the money to invest.

Olympus Mju 7010 Review

July 23rd, 2009 45 Comments   Posted in Digital Compact Cameras

12-megapixel compact Digital Camera

Olympus has announced the new Mju 7010, claiming an “incredibly slim and stylish metal design” for the new mid-range compact.

The vital stats for the new compact are a 12-megapixel sensor, a 7x optical zoom (28-196mm)and a 2.7-inch HyperCrystal II sunlight-viewable LCD display.

Offering a “clever” AF tracking function, Olympus claims sharp images even if the subject is moving. There’s an intelligent i-Auto option that auto-adjusts to five common scene modes, dual image stabilisation and VGA at 30fps movie recording with sound.

On the novelty side there’s “Magic Filters” for special effects, such as “Pop Art”, “Pin Hole”, “Fish Eye” and “Sketch”. In addition, the 7010 offers a in-camera “Panorama” setting for landscapes and a wide zoom function for group shots and close-ups.

Advanced face detection works for up to 16 people while “Beauty Mode” makes them look better, apparently.

xD-Picture card and microSD card compatible, the camera will come complete with software and be available in titanium grey, candy pink and starry silver from August

Olympus Mju 7010

Fujifilm FinePix J150w Review

June 13th, 2009 33 Comments   Posted in Digital Compact Cameras

Fujifilm FinePix J150W Features

The maximum image resolution supported by this camera is 3648 x 2736. Other possible image resolutions are 3648 x 2432, 2592 x 1944, 2048 x 1944, 1600 x 1200 and 640 x 480. Two image ratios possible in this camera are 4:3 and 3:2. The size of the camera sensor is 1/2.3″. It uses a CCD type sensor and the pixel density of the camera is 35 MP/cm². Wide zoom is possible up to 28mm and tele zoom is possible up to 140mm. Images can be captured in three quality levels. They are basic, normal and fine. It uses a 3.0” LCD for display and the resolution of this LCD display is 230,000 pixels.

Fujifilm FinePix J150W supports auto focusing. They have included the imagestabilization feature to improve the quality of the captured image. Normal focus range is 60cm and macro focus range is 5cm. Fujifilm FinePix J150W is provided with an in built flash and it does not support external flash. It supports 5 flash modes.

They are On, Off, Auto, Slow sync and Red eye reduction. It supports movie recording and movie clips can be recorded I two resolutions. They are 640 x 480 30 fps and 320 x 240 30 fps. Camera is also provided with a self timer, which can be set for 2 seconds or 10 seconds.

Weight and Storage

Fujifilm FinePix J150W weighs about 181g. The dimension of the camera is 92 x 58 x 23 mm. They have provided a 24 MB internal storage facility. Different storage media supported by the camera include SD card and SDHC card.

Power and Connectivity

Fujifilm FinePix J150W utilizes a NP-45 Lithium Ion battery for its power requirements. You can share the images taken by connecting it to a computer with the help of the data cable provided with the camera. Camera supports USB connectivity and video out connectivity.

Price and Looks

Fujifilm FinePix J150W costs around 180$. It is a compact digital camera and easy to carry.

Pros and Cons

  • It is provided with face detection facility, which can detect up to 6 faces at a time.
  • Good quality high resolution images can be obtained with the help of this camera.
  • Picture stabilization mode is provided for capturing images with more quality.
  • Zoom function will not work during movie recording.
  • It does not support mechanical image stabilization.

Buy the Fujifilm FinePix J150w Online

Nikon Coolpix L20 Digital Camera

Nikon Coolpix L20 Reviews

Cameras.uk reviews the Nikon Coolpix L20 and writes;
“L20 performs very well for a cheaper compact digital camera. Many of the photos I produced with it are above average. .. If you are looking for a cheaper digital camera that takes a good picture and is extremely easy to use then you cannot go far wrong with the Nikon Coolpix L20.”
Rating: ★★★★☆

Buy the Nikon L20 Digital Camera at Dirt Cheap Cameras

Canon powershot G10

GoodGearGuide reviews the Canon G10 and writes;
“The G10 is compact but it packs plenty of manual features and is ideal for an enthusiast who doesn’t want to lug around a D-SLR. We found it to be very well-suited to low-light photography and macro shots, but it will perform well in any situation. ”
Rating: ★★★★½

TrustedReviews reviews the Canon G10 and writes;
“It is beaten on picture quality and portability by the smaller, lighter and slightly cheaper Panasonic LX3…. It’s still an impressive camera and can produce excellent results, especially in Raw mode ”
Rating: ★★★★½

Cameras.uk reviews the Canon G10 and writes;
“I am struggling to think of a more impressive compact digital camera than the Powershot G10. It is simply the best. Yes the price tag is high, but you pay for great picture quality, build quality and set of features. ”
Rating: ★★★★½

Adorama reviews the Canon Powershot G10 and writes;
“Where the Canon PowerShot G10 really excels is sheer image quality, and here its performance can only be described as awesome—noticeably better than the G9 (which is very good indeed) and far better than other digital cameras of comparable size and price.”
Rating: N/A
CNET reviews the Canon G10 and writes;

“The good: Functional and fun shooting design; great enthusiast-oriented feature set; very nice photo quality The bad: Should be a little faster shot to shot. The bottom line: The Canon PowerShot G10 is a solid enthusiast digital camera for those who want something compact to complement a dSLR.”
PhotographyBlog compares the Canon G10 to Nikon P6000 and writes;
” The Nikon Coolpix P6000 is a good camera, but the Canon PowerShot G10 is better – it’s as simple as that. In terms of both features and handling, the G10 has the edge, and it was invariably the camera that I reached for first…it’s easy to declare the Canon PowerShot G10 as the winner of our first head to head review.”
Rating: N/A
DCR reviews the Canon G10 and writes;
“The bottom line in our opinion is that in spite of some minor imperfections, the latest Canon PowerShot G10 camera proves to be a very well rounded package. In short, even in the face of high expectations, Canon delivered the goods with its latest flagship PowerShot.”
Rating: N/A

KenRockwell reviews the Canon G10 and writes;
“I’d buy a Canon G10 and use it for landscapes, travel, nature and the weird stuff I shoot instead of dragging along an SLR. Even if I was carrying an SLR, I’d rather grab a G10 than change lenses on an SLR. The G10 is that good.”