Olympus Stylus Tough TG-3 Review

May 19th, 2014 No Comments   Posted in Digital Compact Cameras
Olympus Stylus Tough TG-3

Olympus Stylus Tough TG-3 In Red

Previously, opting for a ruggedized digital camera has demanded some serious sacrifices. Either that’s meant comically large housings or less than stellar performance, you could not get yourself a fantastic point-and-shoot digital camera which you can also safely bring on the slopes, the back of a motorbike or while diving. This year’s Olympus Stylus Tough TG-3 is the first such product I have seen that is worth your money. A fast lens, quick focusing as well as solid image quality make the TG-3 an excellent choice even if you simply intend to record the flower garden or perhaps a young child’s 1st steps, but it will also handle far more sophisticated photographing situations effortlessly.

Olympus Stylus Tough TG-3

Olympus Stylus Tough TG-3 In Black

The TG-3 packs the typical collection of high end point-and-shoot functions, such as a 16-megapixel BSI CMOS sensor, a fast 25-100mm, f/2-4.9 aperture 4x internal zoom lens, built-in Wi-fi and also the exact same processor chip Olympus utilizes within the flagship OM-D E-M1 mirrorless digital camera. On the sensor front, it can calculate altitude or water depth as well as atmosphere or water pressure, all of which can be displayed in the digital camera. Additionally, there is built-in GPS, which can locate your position in ten seconds or less, adding location information to individual pictures. My personal favorite feature, however, is the optional LED Light Guide, which redirects light from the camera flash to a ring round the zoom lens, allowing you to record macro photos just like a professional.

Olympus Stylus Tough TG-3 Screen

The LCD screen is easy to use, even in direct sunlight

I spent a few days photographing with the TG-3. Granted, this is not the most competent point-and-shoot available on the market — Sony’s RX100 III most likely has that honour — however the digital camera nonetheless dealt with significantly different photographing conditions just like a champion. I discovered the focus speed to be excellent, allowing the capture of fast-moving objects without missing the shot. The display screen was bright enough for framing photos as well as confirming exposure and sharpness in direct sunlight, and the controls were responsive and simple to comprehend.

The digital camera can pair with Olympus’ Image Share application on an Android os or iOS smart phone or tablet, and overall performance there is extremely good also. You scan a QR code on the camera’s display screen to get connected the 1st time, then going forward you just launch Wi-fi mode in the TG-3 and open up the Olympus application. Following that you’re able to fire off photos remotely as well as transfer pictures individually or in a group. The in-camera PhotoStory mode additionally allows you to take Instagram-size (1:1) split-photos, with three pictures in one single frame. I could to upload to Instagram merely seconds after shooting.

Needless to say, battery-life is not going to correspond to exactly what you’re going to get with a mirrorless digital camera or DIGITAL SLR, however I did manage to take over five hundred photos as well as 3 1/2 mins of 1080p movie in one recharge. The camera charges through USB, however it utilizes a proprietary cable, so you will need to bring that accessory with you on overnight excursions. In general, I was extremely pleased with the TG-3. I did not have an opportunity to bring it under water or even drop it from a height of 2 m (which it’s thought to survive unscathed), however I would not hesitate to utilize this particular ruggedized point-and-shoot for everyday photography, it’s really a incredibly solid pick. In short the Olympus Stylus TG-3 is a ruggedized digital camera which doesn’t blow.

Canon PowerShot N Review

January 19th, 2013 176 Comments   Posted in Digital Compact Cameras

Canon’s PowerShot N is regarded as the intriguing-designed compact camera around the showfloor only at that year’s CES. Now, Canon aren’t noted for gimmicks and that he PowerShot brand usually means staid reliability, therefore we were curious to determine what the organization was as much as.
It sticks out immediately because of its unconventional square design. We were not quite sure how you can hold it in the beginning, especially as there is no traditional shutter button on the top, nor the typical selection of controls around the back that website beneath your thumb.
Rather you grasp it similarly and relaxation your forefinger on top of the contact lens. You will find two controls here, a zoom ring controls the 8x optical zoom and merely behind this can be a second ring when pressed functions like a shutter button. It is a little awkward in the beginning but you will get accustomed to finding all of them with your finger – hands it to some friend though plus they may struggle.
It is available in both whitened and black, but could be decorated using a variety of clip-on half covers – like the blue one pictured here in addition to patterned versions. One anxiety about the look may be the small 870mAh battery power, although it reaches least exchangeable. The compact design does mean it takes only micro SD cards. Overall a great compact point and shoot camera

FujiFilm XF1 Review

December 8th, 2012 84 Comments   Posted in Digital Compact Cameras

The good news for anyone wanting to explore photography further is that the Fuji X-F1 also features full manual control and the ability to shoot in raw format.

Keen to appeal to the Instagram and Hipstamatic crowd, Fuji has elected to include a number of creative digital filters on the X-F1. These include Pop Colour, Toy Camera and Dynamic tone

The Fujifilm XF1 is an advanced compact camera that offers a retro design, 12 megapixel 2/3-inch EXR CMOS sensor, a 4x, 25-100mm, f/1.8-4.9 zoom lens with a manual zoom ring, 1080p movie recording, 7fps burst shooting and a 3-inch LCD monitor with a resolution of 460,000 dots. Other key features of the Fujifilm XF1 include an aluminium body, ISO range of 100-12800, full range of manual controls, Fujifilm’s EXR shooting modes, optical image stabilisation, raw image capture, an integrated manual pop-up flash, film simulation modes, 360° motion panoramas, an electronic level gauge and fast processing and response times. The Fujifilm XF1 is available in black, red and tan

Canon PowerShot S100 Review

September 17th, 2011 189 Comments   Posted in Digital Compact Cameras

Like the S95, the S100 can be slipped into a shirt or trouser pocket, whereas the larger G12 is more of a coat-pocket-sized model. Naturally this makes the S100 more attractive as a ‘take anywhere’ camera for keen enthusiasts.
Although the S100 doesn’t look dramatically different from the S95, we are told that Canon went back to the drawing board to design the new camera – we’ve even seen a few design sketches to prove it.
Canon’s new PowerShot S100 looks a very worthy successor to the popular S95. The manufacturer has used technology from across its whole imaging business (video, SLR, lens and compact camera) to produce what appears to be an exciting pocket-sized camera.

Like the S95, the S100 can be slipped into a shirt or trouser pocket, whereas the larger G12 is more of a coat-pocket-sized model. Naturally this makes the S100 more attractive as a ‘take anywhere’ camera for keen enthusiasts.
Although the S100 doesn’t look dramatically different from the S95, we are told that Canon went back to the drawing board to design the new camera – we’ve even seen a few design sketches to prove it.
Canon’s new PowerShot S100 looks a very worthy successor to the popular S95. The manufacturer has used technology from across its whole imaging business (video, SLR, lens and compact camera) to produce what appears to be an exciting pocket-sized camera.

Fuji FinePix S1600 Review

May 29th, 2010 203 Comments   Posted in Digital Compact Cameras

The Fujifilm FinePix S1600 is a new super-zoom digital compact camera that looks and feels like a DSLR. Featuring a 15x zoom lens with a 28-420mm focal range, 12 megapixels and a 3 inch LCD screen, the Fujifilm S1600 offers full manual photographic control for the more experienced user and an Automatic Scene Recognition mode for beginners. For movie makers the S1600 has the must-have feature of 2010, high-definition 720p video recording at 30fps. Dual Image Stabilization, an electronic viewfinder, ISO 64 up to ISO 1600 at full resolution, high-speed shooting up to 20 frames at 8 fps (at 3 megapixels), Tracking Auto Focus and Panorama Shooting mode complete the S1600’s main specifications

he Fujifilm FinePix S1600 is a 12.2 Megapixel bridge camera. The Fujifilm S1600 features manually adjustable controls but unlike the DSLR or (Micro Four Thirds) system cameras the camera has a single fixed lens.

Fuji FinePix S1600