Tamron SP 150-600mm F5-6.3 DI VC USD Lens Review

July 8th, 2014 No Comments   Posted in Digital SLR Cameras, SLR Lenses
Tamron SP 150-600mm F5-6.3 DI VC USD Lens Profile

The Tamron SP 150-600mm F5-6.3 DI VC USD Lens cuts an impressive profile

Tamron’s SP150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di VC USD is amongst the longest zoom lenses available for ‘full-frame’ and APS-C format DIGITAL SLR cameras. As a Di zoom lens, it can be utilized on both of the ‘full frame’ and cropped sensor systems. Its focal length range is equivalent to 225 to 900mm with DX sensor DSLR’s from Nikon and Sony and 240 to 960mm on Canon EOS DSLR’s.

The optical design of this zoom lens is necessarily complicated, using twenty elements in thirteen groups. The leading group contains 3 LD (Low Dispersion) glass elements (2 within the 1st group, 1 within the 3rd) for enhanced optical correction effectiveness, making it possible for the zoom lens to compensate for on-axis aberrations at the telephoto end.

Tamron’s eBAND (Extended Bandwidth & Angular-Dependency) coating and conventional BBAR (Broad-Band Anti-Reflection) have been used to suppress internal reflections as well as minimise flare and ghosting. The nine-bladed iris diaphragm closes to a rounded aperture for appealing bokeh.

Tamron’s VC (Vibration Compensation) system uses 3 voice coils for lenses with Canon and Nikon mounts. The driving coils trigger the shake-compensating VC zoom lens group electromagnetically through 3 ceramic ball bearings, which in turn support these with very little friction.

Stabilisation is not incorporated into Sony mount models because it is included in their DIGITAL SLR bodies.

The USD (Ultrasonic Silent Drive) AF drive within the zoom lens promises to deliver high torque, extremely fast reaction times, and extremely low noise. Full-time manual over-ride is possible in AF mode.

Tamron SP 150-600mm F5-6.3 DI VC USD focus motor

Tamron SP 150-600mm F5-6.3 DI VC USD focus motor

The most obvious targets for this zoom lens are sporting and wildlife photographers, especially birders, that are hunting for a long telephoto zoom lens at a reasonable cost. There are not many 600mm lenses for DIGITAL SLR cameras which belong to this category – or close to it.

Build and Ergonomics

Being a comparatively large and hefty zoom lens, the SP150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di VC USD is much better suitable for pro as well as pro-sumer digital camera bodies compared to entry level DSLRs. It felt nicely balanced on an EOS 5D camera, owing to its strategically-positioned tripod mount. Although not quite as comfortable or simple to manage on an EOS 70D.

You can easily sit the bigger digital camera with the zoom lens attached on a steady support and be certain it’s going to stay in place and secure enough to capture with, which is convenient when you need to take a quick photo and do not have a tripod close at hand. However, the dimensions and weight of the zoom lens make it most suitable for tripod mounting – and you will need a durable and stable tripod with a quality head.

There is absolutely nothing to make a complaint in regards to the build quality of the zoom lens. As stated by Tamron, it’s moisture-resistant and you will easily feel the rubber sealing gasket should you run a fingertip across the zoom lens mount.

Even though the barrel is manufactured primarily from polycarbonate plastic material, it is actually high-quality and there aren’t any gaps to be noticed wherever components join. The overall finish is actually first-rate and all of the necessary components are of a suitable quality and properly designed to augment the lens.

Without the hood affixed, the barrel measures just under 260 millimeters long. Installing the hood contributes an additional 102 millimeters. The overall weight with the hood and tripod collar installed is just below 2 kgs.

The inner barrel at the front end of the lens is threaded for 95 millimeter filters, whilst the outer barrel features a bayonet mounting for the lens hood.  The barrel flares gently outward starting about twenty five millimeters back from the hood mount.

Performance

Lateral chromatic aberration was very well managed for this kind of high-magnification zoom lens and we uncovered no noticeable coloured fringing within test shots.

We detected a small drop in image sharpness towards the 600mm focal length setting in photos taken with both cameras. Nevertheless, focal lengths up to around 300mm supplied impressive sharpness and an abundance of contrast.

Autofocusing was actually rapidly as well as precise with the evaluation zoom lens, provided light levels were sufficient and there was adequate contrast in the subject matter for the lens to lock on to. In inadequate illumination as well as with low contrast subjects, hunting was common and it may take a second or so for the zoom lens to lock on – and even then you’ll probably need to make use of AF area selection and choose the area carefully when the primary subject is off-centre.

Tamron SP 150-600mm F5-6.3 DI VC USD Lens Sample Bokeh

Depth of field is actually exceptionally shallow with longer focal lengths and, should you shoot with the zoom lens wide open, the plane of sharpness is extremely narrow. This brings about smooth bokeh this is certainly extremely attractive and offers exceptional separation of the subject from the background.

Tracking motion was not quite as simple as we expected and we found it challenging to maintain the subject within the frame – and sharp – whenever recording bursts of images following moving birds.

The photographing technique to accomplish a high percentage of razor-sharp images calls for plenty of practice. Unfortunately we haven’t had enough practice for this type of shooting.

Setting the focus limiter enhances your chances whenever photographing in indifferent lighting circumstances along with when subject contrast is low, especially using longer focal length settings. However even when there seemed to be an abundance of light, we discovered minor hesitation when the zoom lens was required to change focus rapidly between close and distant subjects.

With smaller – and more normal – adjustments to focusing distance, the zoom lens reacted rapidly enough to satisfy the majority of prospective buyers, though minor hesitation often happened with the longer focal lengths. With stationary subjects, the zoom lens can capture an abundance of detail.

Stabilisation was extremely effective, permitting the lens to be handheld at shutter speeds as slow as 1/160 second and obtain over fifty percent of the photographs crisp. The stabilisation of the viewfinder image makes it much simpler to compose shots, especially when the subject is not moving.

Tamron SP 150-600mm F5-6.3 DI VC USD Lens Flare

Backlit subjects were managed exceptionally well, with thanks to the generous lens hood. We were not able to force the zoom lens to flare, even if a bright source of light was on the edge of the frame.

Depth of field is actually exceptionally shallow with longer focal lengths and, should you shoot with the zoom lens wide open, the plane of sharpness is extremely narrow. This brings about smooth bokeh this is certainly extremely attractive and offers exceptional separation of the subject from the background.

Both the rectilinear distortion and vignetting were relatively low – but clearly apparent. Distortion was within the shape of pincushion distortion. It was present through the entire focal length range, although you most likely would not notice it inside photos unless they included straight line running parallel to the image frame.

Vignetting was most obvious at the extremes of the zoom range, with edges as well as corners being a little bit over a stop darker as compared to middle. The darkening disappear around a stop down from maximum aperture. Both problems are very easily remedied, either with in-camera processing or during post-capture editing.

Backlit subjects were managed exceptionally well, with thanks to the generous lens hood. We were not able to force the zoom lens to flare, even if a bright source of light was on the edge of the frame. A smallish region around the bright spot displayed minimal loss of contrast; the remainder of the frame maintained the entire dynamic range anticipated from the subject.

Conclusions

The Tamron SP 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di VC USD would definitely rate a recommendation based on its price alone, all the other factors being equal. Its nearest rival is Sigma’s 150-500mm f/5-6.3 APO DG OS HSM, that features a comparable AF drive mechanism and optical stabilisation. Nevertheless it covers a reduced range and its coatings are not up to the specifications of Tamron’s eBAND coatings.

Sigma additionally makes a considerably much longer zoom lens, their 300-800mm f /5.6 EX zoom, that is in excess of 1 / 2 a metre long – without lens hood – and weighs in at 5.88 kgs. Its price places it beyond the reach of all but the most committed (as well as cashed-up) specialists.

Canon as well as Nikon each make telephoto zoom lenses however both have maximum focal lengths of 400mm, though with maximum apertures which ranges from f/4-5.6. Both Canon’s EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM and Nikon’s AF-S 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6G ED VR Nikkor lens sells significantly more than the Tamron.

Tamron additionally makes a 200-500mm f/5-6.3 Di LD (IF) zoom lens, that is an older design which is lacking Vibration Compensation, USD silent focusing as well as eBAND anti-reflective coating.

This makes the Tamron zoom lens something of a bargain.

This new zoom lens is approximately thirty millimeters longer and 715 grms weightier versus the earlier model as well as its close focusing distance is actually twenty cm longer. Given the longer range and less expensive price tag, that is quite a remarkable accomplishment.

Canon EOS 100D Review

Providing the exact same picture quality as other entry-level Canon SLRs but with a considerably more compact body, the 100D is a satisfying first step into the world of SLR camera photography.

Canon EOS 100D 18-55mm IS STM Angle

Canon EOS 100D 18-55mm IS STM kit

Tempted by the prospect of an interchangeable lens camera (ILC)? Canon would like to get you back once again to the world of SLRs with the 100D.

Layout and features

Developed for photographers that always desired the flexibility of an SLR camera, but have become discouraged by the dimensions and weight, the 100D has a weight of only 407 grams. Even though it looks a lot like every other Canon SLR camera from the exterior, everything is more compact — 12 % trimmer compared to the 650D.

Not a great deal has become compromised on the specifications sheet, nevertheless. The camera offers exactly the same 18-megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor as the 650D along with the 700D, which was revealed simultaneously with the 100D. It features a Digic 5 image processor chip as well as nine AF points, although just one cross-type at the centre.

Canon EOS 100D 18-55mm IS STM

Canon EOS 100D 18-55mm IS STM Kit

Dependant upon the lens you couple the camera with, the 100D rests beautifully in the palm of your hand. The grip is compact, and bigger hands may find that they overwhelm the slim body. Rotate the camera around, and the 3-inch touchscreen display occupies the vast majority of rear panel. This also ensures that other control keys as well as dials are kept to an absolute minimum. A four-way directional pad exists, but lacks any marks to demonstrate exactly what each and every direction is utilized for. Playback, exposure compensation and an aperture button are the other principal controls.

Canon EOS 100D 18-55mm IS STM

Canon EOS 100D 18-55mm IS STM Kit

Even though the downscaling of control keys may appear as if the 100D is merely for novice photographers, the mode dial on the top does indeed accommodate each of the same controls available on every other SLR camera in the form of full program, aperture, shutter and manual exposure modes. Newcomers additionally gain access to complete automatic, portrait, landscape, macro, sports and no flash and creative automatic modes.

Canon EOS 100D 18-55mm IS STM

Canon EOS 100D 18-55mm IS STM Kit

As with any other SLR camera, it is able to capture JPEG as well as RAW pictures, whilst support for quicker UHS-I SD cards ensures that the buffer receives a boost to a maximum of 1140 JPEG photos when you use continuous mode. At four fps, continuous shooting isn’t a slouch, either. On the rear of the camera sits the identical 3-inch capacitive touchscreen display which was on the 650D.

Canon EOS 100D Sample Photo

Canon EOS 100D Sample Photo

The hybrid CMOS AF system is perfect for photographers who shoot mainly in Live View, or who take a large amount of video. Additionally present in the 650D, the phase-detection system swiftly grabs a focusing point, and then the camera switches in to the more conventional contrast detection to attain accurate focus. In the 100D, the hybrid system now covers 80 per cent of the sensor size, which is designed to give much better results than previous cameras.

Connectivity can be found in the form of a 3.5mm microphone port, remote port, USB as well as HDMI out — each revealed beneath the single flap at the side of the camera. As with any other Canon SLRs, image stabilisation is supplied through the lens.

Canon EOS 100D 18-55mm IS STM

Canon EOS 100D 18-55mm IS STM Kit

The 100D now receives the capability to preview creative filter effects in Live View mode on the display screen, before you take the photo.

The 100D didn’t slow down significantly when producing a burst of JPEG photos, progressing to about 30 frames before any indication of processing time or buffering came into play.

The focusing system is agile, on level with previous digital slr cameras found in this class from Canon. There are actually, nevertheless, very small focusing points within the viewfinder, which might be challenging to pinpoint upon your desired subject. Undoubtedly that Canon is counting on many users to compose and take photos utilizing Live View along with the touchscreen display, which supports features like touch to focus for more precise handling. When you use Live View, focusing remains equally slow as on all of the other entry level Canon SLRs, therefore try not to expect any remarkable improvements there.

Just what is absent on the 100D is an inbuilt Wi-Fi option. With an increasing number of ILCs and SLRs having this particular functionality, it’s a pity that there is not a way to instantly transfer pictures or movies to a mobile device, particularly as this is a characteristic touted on various other Canon digital cameras, such as the PowerShot N and higher-end 6D.

Canon rates the battery pack at 350 photos utilising the optical viewfinder or 150 photos with Live View, which is considerably less than the other SLRs found in this range, including the 1100D, that can handle 750 shots making use of the viewfinder before a recharge is required.

Image quality

Employing the same sensor as the 700D and 650D, it isn’t surprising that the 100D generates pictures that are extremely consistent to these somewhat larger cameras. On default settings, the camera produces punchy JPEGs with good colour rendition and noise control at low ISO levels.

Reaching up to higher ISO sensitivities, the 100D does a respectable job of keeping noise at bay. ISO 1600 is the highest sensitivity, where noise is very well managed even at maximum resolution — anything greater, and colour shifting begins to happen.

The 100D preserves an identical level of detail in its RAW files, just like the previous cameras mentioned. Detail is recovered best from shadow areas, whilst highlight detail is mainly recoverable except within the most extreme instances of overexposure. Utilizing automatic exposure modes, the 100D does demonstrate a slight level of overexposure when making use of evaluative metering mode.

Video quality is once more in line with what we have observed previously on the Canon series of SLRs. Colours are yet again punchy with strong, defined contrasts between shade and highlight areas using default picture styles. When used along with the kit 18-55mm STM lens, autofocus in video recording is actually noiseless and smooth.

As opposed to cameras like the 700D, for example, the 100D has only room for an integrated mono microphone. This means owners looking for the very best audio quality would want to incorporate an external microphone for stereo sound.

Conclusion

The Canon EOS 100D offers a gratifying experience for newer photographers or those who find themselves looking to purchase a rather compact entry in to the world of SLRs. Nevertheless, it may not be sufficiently small to attract prospective buyers away from a similarly priced mirrorless ILC with additional features.

Canon PowerShot N Review

January 19th, 2013 176 Comments   Posted in Digital Compact Cameras

Canon’s PowerShot N is regarded as the intriguing-designed compact camera around the showfloor only at that year’s CES. Now, Canon aren’t noted for gimmicks and that he PowerShot brand usually means staid reliability, therefore we were curious to determine what the organization was as much as.
It sticks out immediately because of its unconventional square design. We were not quite sure how you can hold it in the beginning, especially as there is no traditional shutter button on the top, nor the typical selection of controls around the back that website beneath your thumb.
Rather you grasp it similarly and relaxation your forefinger on top of the contact lens. You will find two controls here, a zoom ring controls the 8x optical zoom and merely behind this can be a second ring when pressed functions like a shutter button. It is a little awkward in the beginning but you will get accustomed to finding all of them with your finger – hands it to some friend though plus they may struggle.
It is available in both whitened and black, but could be decorated using a variety of clip-on half covers – like the blue one pictured here in addition to patterned versions. One anxiety about the look may be the small 870mAh battery power, although it reaches least exchangeable. The compact design does mean it takes only micro SD cards. Overall a great compact point and shoot camera

Zeiss Distagon T* 2/25 ZE Review

December 15th, 2012 170 Comments   Posted in SLR Lenses

This Zeiss 25mm f/2 Distagon is really a full-frame, manual-focus-only, fully meter- and EXIF-combined lens for Nikon or Canon SLRs.
In comparison mind-to-mind in the test range, the Zeiss 25/2 is a lot sharper in particular apertures than any one of Canon’s latest ultrawide zooms such as the 16-35mm f/2.8 L II or 17-40mm f/4 L, or even the Canon EF 28mm f/1.8 USM. If you are a Canon full-frame shooter who desires more sharpness than you are getting from Canon’s ultrawide contacts, this can be a significant step-up if you do not mind manual focus with full exposure automation.
It is way better made robotically other SLR contacts today.
This Zeiss lens is manual-focus only. It won’t autofocus on any camera.
Unlike present day plastic zooms, this really is all-metal. If you are accustomed to putting your Nikon and Canon plastic special gems lower in your glass table or desktop, back away – you have to be careful with one of these heavy metal and rock Zeiss contacts.
Thank heavens each version focuses within the same direction just like Nikon’s and Canon’s contacts.
Focus is stiff, slow and incredibly damped. It wants two fingers to wrench it around it will not just flick having a finger.
It’s very dense.The red-colored footage engravings are extremely dark and never particularly visible. They stick out a lot more during these photos compared to reality.
The Eos 550d mount doesn’t have red-colored index us dot around the outdoors, just like Canon contacts. You need to search for the red-colored us dot on the rear of the mount, that is a discomfort!
There’s no “25″ engraved quietly. You need to just know, or consider the front from the lens without any cap.
This Zeiss 25 2 is way better than Canon’s ultrawide zooms or even the EF 28mm f/1.8 USM.
This Zeiss is a touch less contrasty within the center at f/2, improving at f/2.8 and optimum by f/4.

Canon PowerShot SX500 IS Review

September 1st, 2012 122 Comments   Posted in Digital Compact Cameras

Canon has included an upgraded AutoFocus system, Intelligent Image Stabilization, and Zoom Framing Assist — a Canon technology which allows you to quickly zoom all the way out to a wide angle to relocate subjects after they’ve left your framing. Canon says this is particularly helpful when shooting animals or moving subjects, as in Zoom Framing Assist, lens retraction and extension are quicker than pressing the zoom buttons.
f you’re looking to save some hard-earned cash and don’t think you’ll need the full 30x optical zoom, Canon has also announced the SX160 IS, which is virtually identical to the SX500 in features, save for the 16x optical zoom, smaller body profile, and the sub-$250 price tag.

Canon PowerShot SX500 IS Features:
  • 30x optical zoom lens (24mm to 720mm)
  • 16-megapixel image sensor
  • 3.0-inch LCD display
  • DIGIC 4 image processor
  • HD Video Recording
  • Smart AUTO Mode
  • Intelligent Image Stabilization
  • Zoom Framing Assist

The PowerShot SX500 IS is the ideal option for users looking for compact power. Utilising Canon’s extensive expertise in lens design, it features a newly-developed 24mm wide-angle, 30x optical zoom lens, small enough to fit in a travel-friendly body. The PowerShot SX160 IS is an affordable, easy-to-use superzoom, boasting a versatile lens custom-designed for this model alone. With a 28mm wide-angle and 16x optical zoom, this new lens offers the flexibility to snap everything from group shots at children’s birthday parties, to long-distance close-ups of animals at the zoo.