HTC Wildfire S Grey Android Telstra Next G Review

October 1st, 2011 157 Comments   Posted in Mobile Phone Reviews

The HTC Wildfire S scraps the optical trackpad that was used on the original model and instead opts for the now standard four touch-sensitive keys — home, menu, back and search. The keys themselves work well, but are easy to press accidentally due to the small screen.

There are no physical buttons on the front of the phone, with HTC opting for four capacitive touch-buttons. These are your standard Android Home, Menu, Back and Search options. They’re responsive, plus HTC has put in a little vibration feedback to reassure your brain that your finger did indeed just hit the right spot.

Cheaper Android phones usually come with some compromises that often revolve around the display, and the HTC Wildfire S is no exception. Though the increased resolution of 320×480 pixels over its predecessor’s 240×320 pixels is welcomed, the display fares poorly in direct sunlight, has mediocre viewing angles and does not render text well. Thankfully, the screen is responsive to touch and this results in a pleasing user experience, though text input is rather cramped given the small size of the screen.

Viewsonic ViewPad 10s Review

April 2nd, 2011 117 Comments   Posted in Laptop Reviews

ViewSonic is still trying to get some traction in the tablet space with their Android 2.2 Froyo powered ViewPad 7, but the manufacturer renowned for producing displays is pushing ahead with their latest creation – the ViewPad 10. Now this isn’t simply just a rehash of the ViewPad 7 with a larger display, oh no, but rather, it’s able to differentiate itself from most things out there since it’s dubbed as the “world’s first” dual-boot Windows 7 and Android tablet. Considering its plentiful productivity aspects, the $599 starting cost of the ViewSonic ViewPad 10 just might seem attractive enough to stand out with most things.
Even though the ViewPad 7 was neither galvanizing or mundane in design, the ViewPad 10 is just one stale looking tablet. Honestly, it’s by no means slim (0.65” thick) in any way, especially when you factor in its netbook like components, but its monotonous and straightforward design approach doesn’t contribute in its cause in being original. Of course, the cheap black plastic and somewhat fake feeling aluminum rear cover supplements to its overall tasteless embodiment, but we’re not digging its sheer chunky size over other comparably sized Android tablets. Furthermore, its straight angled bezel doesn’t particularly sit too well in making it ergonomic – especially when we feel its sharp edges pressing against our palms as we hold it.
For a manufacturer known amongst the industry in expertly crafting wonderful looking monitors and displays, we’re rather dismayed in finding a low caliber one utilized by the ViewPad 10. Sizing up with a 10.1” LCD capacitive screen with LED backlighting, it’s more than plentiful in real estate, but its resolution of 600 x 1024 pixels blatantly uncovers its pixelated appearance. Horrifically, you easily lose focus of what’s on-screen since its ridiculously poor viewing angles distort colors when you slightly move it away from a 90 degree angle. Moreover, its overall color production is distinctively on the dull side – which makes you really wonder how ViewSonic is even able to accept its display as tolerable.

ViewSonic is still trying to get some traction in the tablet space with their Android 2.2 Froyo powered ViewPad 7, but the manufacturer renowned for producing displays is pushing ahead with their latest creation – the ViewPad 10. Now this isn’t simply just a rehash of the ViewPad 7 with a larger display, oh no, but rather, it’s able to differentiate itself from most things out there since it’s dubbed as the “world’s first” dual-boot Windows 7 and Android tablet. Considering its plentiful productivity aspects, the $599 starting cost of the ViewSonic ViewPad 10 just might seem attractive enough to stand out with most things.
Even though the ViewPad 7 was neither galvanizing or mundane in design, the ViewPad 10 is just one stale looking tablet. Honestly, it’s by no means slim (0.65” thick) in any way, especially when you factor in its netbook like components, but its monotonous and straightforward design approach doesn’t contribute in its cause in being original. Of course, the cheap black plastic and somewhat fake feeling aluminum rear cover supplements to its overall tasteless embodiment, but we’re not digging its sheer chunky size over other comparably sized Android tablets. Furthermore, its straight angled bezel doesn’t particularly sit too well in making it ergonomic – especially when we feel its sharp edges pressing against our palms as we hold it.
For a manufacturer known amongst the industry in expertly crafting wonderful looking monitors and displays, we’re rather dismayed in finding a low caliber one utilized by the ViewPad 10. Sizing up with a 10.1” LCD capacitive screen with LED backlighting, it’s more than plentiful in real estate, but its resolution of 600 x 1024 pixels blatantly uncovers its pixelated appearance. Horrifically, you easily lose focus of what’s on-screen since its ridiculously poor viewing angles distort colors when you slightly move it away from a 90 degree angle. Moreover, its overall color production is distinctively on the dull side – which makes you really wonder how ViewSonic is even able to accept its display as tolerable.

Sony Ericcson Xperia Arc Review

January 15th, 2011 104 Comments   Posted in Mobile Phone Reviews

The design is very sleek too – the curved back sloping attractively inwards rather than using the bulbous human curvature design of last year, and sits very nicely in the hand with a width of just 8.7mm at the middle.

The front keys on the phone are thankfully physical, making it easier to hit them without looking, and mixing the design of the original X10 and the Vivaz, again adding to the aesthetic.
Despite the presence of video calling functionality in Google’s Android 2.3, the Xperia Arc is devoid of a video calling function – we can’t say we’re upset, because it’s only in tablets that we think we’ll see the need for proper video calling.

The HDMI-out port is located on the top of the phone too, and while we didn’t get the chance to test out the functionality, we’re promised by Sony Ericsson that HDMI-mirroring will be possible, meaning you can display anything from multimedia content to websites via your big screen.

Sony Ericsson will be bundling a mini-HDMI lead in with each Xperia Arc, meaning it will be easy to perform the connection, although DLNA is also offered if you don’t want to have to sit close to the monitor to show off your holiday snaps.